Explore Mercedes-Benz Electric Vehicles

      

The EQS

S-Class levels of luxury with an electric architecture all its own. Arriving this year. 

The EQB

An all-terrain, all-electric SUV with optional seating for seven. Scheduled to arrive in 2022. 

The EQE

A mid-size sedan with E-Class lineage and electric power. Scheduled to arrive in 2022. 
 
 

The Advantage of Electric Intelligence

Electric vehicles present clear benefits in the areas of sustainability and efficiency, but also in performance and design. At Mercedes-Benz, we pledge to embrace the electric future while continuing to build the greatest cars the world has ever seen.

 

Safety, performance, and technology with an all-electric twist.

Mercedes-Benz vehicles have always excelled in those three areas, and electric drivetrains give us the opportunity to advance our capabilities even further. From quicker acceleration to elevated ride comfort, the benefits of electric power are immediate, but our vision doesn't stop there. Technology "under the hood" is matched by technology in the driver's seat. Improved battery power is matched by improved design. Mercedes-EQ vehicles are built to appeal to your intelligence and your emotions.

All Mercedes-EQ vehicles use synchronous motors, known for their high efficiency, compact size and ability to produce high torque at low speeds. 

Available in the new EQS, MBUX Hyperscreen is a 56" curved glass instrument panel that stretches from door to door and provides a seamless interface. 


Positioned beneath the vehicle floor, our next-generation Lithium-ion batteries set new benchmarks in performance, efficiency and charging capacity. 

 

 Charge at Home

There's no better place to charge up than in the comfort of your own garage. Safe, convenient and cost-effective, the Home Flex from ChargePoint can be installed through Qmerit, so you can charge overnight and be ready to hit the road.

 Charge on the Go

Mercedes me Charge is the official charging network of Mercedes-EQ. Through MBUX in your vehicle or the Mercedes me Connect app on your phone, you can seamlessly plan trips, locate charging stations and initiate payment at nearly 60,000 public chargers nationwide.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Cost & Savings

There is. For more details, see your certified tax professional or read about the Plug-In Electric Drive Vehicle Credit from the Internal Revenue Service.

Many states offer their own incentives, including rebates and other non-monetary incentives like unlimited access to the HOV lane, which saves you time in traffic. To see your state's incentives, visit www.afdc.energy.gov/laws/state.

Yes, but it's much cheaper. Electricity in the United States is typically around 12 cents per kWh. If you drive 15,000 miles a year, that's about $540. A year of gas, on the other hand, can cost around $1,400. On top of that, the price of gasoline can fluctuate wildly, whereas the price of electricity is relatively stable. To see the average price of electricity in your state, visit the website for the Energy Information Administration.

Frequently Asked Questions

Battery

Yes, but it's much cheaper. Electricity in the United States is typically around 12 cents per kWh. If you drive 15,000 miles a year, that's about $540. A year of gas, on the other hand, can cost around $1,400. On top of that, the price of gasoline can fluctuate wildly, whereas the price of electricity is relatively stable. To see the average price of electricity in your state, visit the website for the Energy Information Administration.

Lithium-ion batteries are known for being lightweight, quick to charge, and having a long service life, which makes them perfect for electric cars. Our lithium-ion batteries are automotive grade batteries, unlike the ones that are in our mobile phones, laptops, and other devices, they are engineered for longevity.

No, careful attention is paid by our engineers to ensure that a Mercedes-Benz EQ vehicle meets our high standards of safety. The battery pack is sealed, and high-voltage circuits are protected from casual contact and appropriately marked so you know where they're located. All high voltage cables and circuits are also marked and are in bright orange with warning labels on them.

The same high safety standards that define Mercedes-Benz cars apply to our electric vehicles. The batteries are all safely protected in the event of an accident, and depending on the severity of the accident, the high voltage system is automatically disconnected in fractions of a second.

Just as you would with a gas-powered vehicle, you'll need to take extra steps during long term storage. Instructions can be found in the operator's manual.

Since the battery used in our electric vehicles is automotive- grade, it's extremely durable and engineered for longevity and reliability. Very rarely does a battery need to be replaced during the average ownership period.

Frequently Asked Questions

Charging

Regenerative braking adds to your charge as you drive. When the vehicle is coasting and the driver touches the brake pedal, the electric motor acts as a generator, slowing the car and pumping electric power back into the battery. Essentially, the momentum of the car is converted into extra power, extending your range as you go.

You might have heard of three levels of charging electric vehicles: Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3 DC fast charging. Here's what they mean:

Level 1 charging: This is charging that takes place on a typical electric outlet.

Level 2 charging: This level of charging utilizes a wallbox that’s connected to a 240-volt outlet. Away from home, most public charging stations are Level 2. Some are free, while others require a paid membership. This is the most common type of charging for electric vehicles.

Level 3 DC Fast Charging: This is the fastest kind of charging currently available, with a growing number of stations available publicly. The amount of electricity they require, and cost of installation, makes them impractical for home use. DC Fast Charging can also be found along highways, making long road trips possible for EVs

There are tens of thousands of charging stations throughout the United States, with more being added practically every day. The best way to find them is with Mercedes me Charge, our charging ecosystem. Mercedes me Charge integrates multiple charging networks into one, giving you more freedom and flexibility. You can view all available places to charge in the Mercedes me Connect app or even in the head unit of your Mercedes-EQ vehicle.

Yes, but it's worth noting that a standard household outlet is a 110V outlet which is far less powerful than a 240V outlet, which is typically found with dryers or can be installed by a licensed electrician. The good news is that having a 240V charging station installed in your home is easy. The ChargePoint Home Flex is the wallbox we’d recommend. Please go to their website to purchase one. In addition, we recommend using Qmerit for installation.

Every Mercedes-Benz electric vehicle has specific features to ensure safe charging. Instead of the electricity flowing as soon as it's plugged in, like a traditional appliance, the vehicle and wallbox converse to make sure it's safe before any electricity flows. Special attention has also been paid to make sure you can safely charge in wet weather.

Frequently Asked Questions

Performance

In many ways, you'll notice an improvement. Unlike gas cars, electric cars deliver power to your wheels instantly, with no lag time, as soon as you step on the pedal. The result is greater torque and acceleration. They're also exceptionally smooth. There's no gear shift and no shaking when idle. Most drivers are so accustomed to the constant vibration of gas vehicles that it isn't until they experience electric that they realize the remarkable difference.

MPGe is the efficiency number to provide an equivalent to the traditional miles per gallon. Essentially, it's how manufacturers show the efficiency of a vehicle: The higher the MPGe, the more efficient it is. The other way to measure efficiency with an electric vehicle is through Watt-hours (Wh)/mile or kilowatt-hours (kWh)/100 miles. The lower the number here, the better.